Make sure the metrics reflect factors that are under the control of the service provider. To motivate good behavior, SLA metrics must reflect factors that lie in the control of the extern externator. A typical mistake is to sanction the service provider for delays caused by the customer`s lack of performance. For example, when the customer provides application code change specifications several weeks late, it is unfair and demotivating to keep the service provider on a predetermined delivery date. Designing the SLA from two sides by measuring the customer`s performance in interdependent actions is a good way to focus on the expected results. Choose measures that motivate good behavior. The first objective of each metric is to motivate the appropriate behavior on behalf of the customer and the service provider. Each part of the relationship will strive to optimize its actions to achieve the performance goals set by the metrics. Focus first on the behavior you want to motivate. Then test your metrics by placing yourself on the other side instead. How would you optimize your performance? Does this optimization support the initially desired results? The agreement should also indicate what both teams need to achieve their goals. If you write this down on paper, the tendency to blame is eliminated if things go wrong.

For example, the marketing department may need regular updates on the status of the distribution pipeline. This would help them tailor their efforts accordingly in order to generate more or better quality leads. By developing an SLA between your sales and service teams, you can ensure that your sales team expects customers, which your service team can actually track in order to provide those customers with the best possible experience. Organizations using an SLA report significantly higher profit rates, which highlights the case for enabling sales through closer coordination between distribution and marketing. More and more companies now understand that they can no longer work in silos and still expect a competitive advantage. . . .