A number of merchants allow customers using a debit card to withdraw cash as part of the EFTPOS transaction. [15] In Australia, this possibility (known in many other countries as debit card cashback) is known as “cash-out”. For the merchant, payment is a way to reduce their net cash income and save cash during their banking operations. There are no additional fees for the merchant for making payments available, as banks charge a merchant a debit card transaction fee per EFTPOS transaction,[10] and not on the transaction value. Cash out is a device provided by the merchant and not by the bank, which allows the merchant to limit or vary the amount of money that can be withdrawn simultaneously or suspend the installation at any time. If available, payment is convenient for the customer who can bypass the attendance of a bank branch or ATM. For people in some remote areas, payment may be the only way to withdraw money from their personal accounts. However, most merchants who provide the facility set a relatively low payment limit, usually $50, and some also charge for the service. Some merchants in Australia only allow payment when purchasing goods; Other merchants allow withdrawals, whether or not customers buy goods.

Withdrawals related to the sale by credit card are not possible, since credit card transactions allow the merchant to receive a percentage commission based on the transaction value and also because cash withdrawals are treated differently from purchase transactions made by the credit card company. (While this is not consistent with a merchant`s agreement with any credit card company, the merchant may treat a cash withdrawal as part of a regular credit card sale.) EFTPOS transactions on a debit, credit or prepayment card are authenticated mainly by entering a personal identification number (PIN) at the point of sale. In the past, these transactions have been authenticated by the merchant with the cardholder`s signature, signed on their receipt. However, distributors had become increasingly negligent in enforcing this audit, leading to an increase in fraud. Since then, Australian banks have used chip and PIN technology with the global standard for CEM cards. As of August 1, 2014, Australian dealers no longer accept signatures for transactions made by domestic customers to point-of-sale terminals. [16] [17] Macquarie proposes that Suncorp`s bank (SUN) be the most obvious candidate with 23,000 terminals. . . .